How to structure a motivational speech – and what does the wolf have to do with it?

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“I don’t know how to motivate others.”
“What should I say to inspire my team?”
“I have run out of ideas and I don’t think my life is that inspiring.”

Well, my dear colleague, you are not alone.

Inspiring and motivating others through speech is not easy, but it’s also not that difficult. You see, “to inspire” is to influence or arouse a feeling or a thought in others, whereas “to motivate” is to provide a motive and to incite them towards taking action. You can be inspirational without being motivational, but you can’t be motivational without being inspirational.

You see, there are certain narratives that speakers, filmmakers, and storytellers often go back to. According to Christopher Booker who wrote The Seven Basic Plots: Why We Tell Stories, he identifies 7 basic narratives. They are:

1. Overcoming the Monster
2. Rags to Riches
3. The Quest
4. Voyage and Return
5. Comedy
6. Tragedy
7. Rebirth

I don’t fully agree with his categorisation (which I will explain in a different blog), but for now, “Overcoming the Monster” is a useful plot for you to consider. For example, Booker writes:

“We first usually encounter these extraordinary creations early in our lives, in the guises of the wolves, witches and giants of fairy tales. Little Red Riding Hood goes off into the great forest to visit her kindly grandmother, only to find that granny has been replaced by the wicked wolf, whose only desire is to eat Red Riding Hood. In the nick of time, a brave forester bursts in to kill the wolf with his axe, and the little heroine is saved. Hansel and Gretel are cruelly abandoned to die in the forest, where they meet the apparently kindly old woman who lives in a house made of gingerbread. But she turns out to be a wicked witch, whose only wish is to devour them. Just when all seems lost, they manage to push her into her own oven and burn her to death, finding, as their reward, a great treasure with which they can triumphantly return home. Jack climbs his magic beanstalk to discover at the top a new world, where he enters a mysterious castle belonging to a terrifyingly and bloodthirsty giant. After progressively enraging this monstrous figure by three successive visits, each time managing to steal a golden treasure, Jack finally arouses the giant to what seems like a fatal pursuit. Only in the nick of time does Jack manage to scramble down the beanstalk, and bring it crashing down with an axe. The giant falls to the ground, and Jack is left to enjoy the three priceless treasures he has won from its grasp.” (Booker, 2004, p. 22)

Fairy tales, you wonder?

But you want to inspire and motivate adults, not children.

Well, here’s the commonality. They are here to conquer a monster, slay a dragon, outwit a giant, or kill off a witch. There are monsters out there to be overcome – and with its success, comes freedom, happiness, or maybe a princess that makes the fairy tale end with a “and they lived happily ever after”.

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Watch this Youtube video above where I explain how you can apply it to your life’s experiences. In summary:

  1. For you, you would need to find the monster figures in your life. They could be oppressive colleagues, bosses, teacher, parents, or other authoritative figures. Ask:

    What did they prevent you from doing, or from becoming?

  2. In your pursuit to “slay the dragon” or “overcome this monster”, what steps, strategies, or hacks did you take with you on your journey? Retrace the steps and find out what you did. Ask:

    What did I do at Level 1? And then when it happened again, how did I react and was it successful? What happened next? How did I become better? Did I run away/ escape from its control? Did I stand up for my own rights instead?

    You see, the things you did are the things that helped develop your values — your inner strength, your resilience, your determination and your authenticity in becoming who you are. And that’s the inspiring part.

  3. Make the emotional connection for your audience and invite them to take similar actions. This is where you can motivate them to regain their confidence or faith in themselves or in a higher power. This is also important in helping them connect with your story heart-to-heart, where they can feel you and can empathise with you. But, more importantly, because they see that you have done it, they now know that it’s possible for them too. That’s the positive effect you want in your audience.

This is a video that explains these steps again. More can be said about structuring it or developing the story further, but I want to keep this short. And I’ll leave it to the next blog to help you develop your story deeper and with more interesting conflicts to engage your listeners more.

Till then, go on your #BeastMode and slay your fears. Write that speech now.

At your service,
Ed Chow

 

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Edmund Chow is a public speaking strategist and storytelling coach. Trained as a drama educator and theatre practitioner, Edmund has just submitted his PhD in drama at the University of Manchester. He offers consultancy to teachers, speakers and trainers from curriculum development to workshop facilitation, and from the mechanics of audience engagement to storytelling for entrepreneurs and corporate executives.